Agreement Singh

Thousands of soldiers and weapons continue to be deployed in the immediate vicinity, in some locations within a few hundred meters of the other, so the likelihood of an accidental or accidental escalation that could lead to a major confrontation remains high. Singh said that in response to “China`s action, our armed forces have also carried out appropriate counter-measures in these areas to ensure that India`s borders are fully protected.” At the time of independence, different parts of the Indian subcontinent were under different types of administrative arrangements. There were mainly two types of jurisdictions, the princely ones — large and small, ruled by hereditary princes and provinces that were directly under British administration. The British Raj had concluded separate contracts and agreements with several princely states for a large number of purposes, such as the construction and maintenance of roads and electricity supply facilities, railway rails, communication equipment including post, telegraph and radio, flights, taxes, currency and coins, external affairs, etc. With the fall of the British Raj, these contracts would automatically become null and void. Thus, the newly created Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in consultation with the Princely Chamber (composed of the leaders of the Princes), drew up an agreement to ensure that these administrative arrangements remained unchanged until the drafting of the new Constitution (i.e. deadlocked). . . .