Canadian Free Trade Agreement Labour Mobility

In negotiating the terms of the agreement, the parties were guided by the following principles: “National Trade Agreement”, a national trade agreement within the meaning of subsection 16.1 (1) of the procedure against the Crown Act. (Canadian Trade Agreement) CFTA negotiators used the AIT as well as the New West Partnership Trade Agreement (“NWPTA”), a trade agreement that harmonizes rules and allows for labour mobility between Manitoba, British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan, as models for the new agreement. However, Canada`s labour mobility agreements can facilitate the registration of physicians already licensed in another Canadian province or territory. In addition, although the dispute settlement procedure has undergone administrative and procedural changes, it relies heavily on the AIT and NWPTA. Disputes can still only be negotiated by a compliance group after mediation and consultation have been exhausted, and sanctions can still only be imposed if a party fails to comply with the CFTA after being brought to the attention of a compliance group. The CFTA also manages the governmental-to-government and person/company-to-administrative dispute resolution mechanisms that existed under the AIT. As in the case of the AIT and NWPTA, the defendant remains the government at each complaint, not a regulatory organization. In addition, any fines will be paid to a fund to promote internal trade and will not be paid to the complainant as compensation. Section 1 is amended so that “Chapter 7 (Labour Mobility) of the Agreement on Internal Trade” and “included in national trade agreements” are distributed. While the CFTA has been touted as “the most ambitious free trade agreement” and “the biggest step forward” and has been found to make it easier to hire workers in other provinces, the CFTA`s influence on labour mobility and professional regulatory organizations is actually quite limited. The Canadian Free Trade Agreement (CFTA) is an intergovernmental trade agreement signed by all Canadian premiers (province, territory, federal). The CFTA entered into force on 1 July 2017 and replaced the Free Trade Agreement (AIT). The objective of the agreement is to reduce and eliminate as much as possible barriers to the free movement of people, goods, services and investment within Canada and to create an open, efficient and stable domestic market.

While the AIT has taken a “positive” approach and focused on removing barriers to trade in the eleven sectors specifically listed1, the CFTA uses a “negative list” approach, meaning that it automatically applies to the entire economy and all investment, trade in goods and services, and commercial activity in the provinces and territories, with the exception of the latter, which are expressly excluded. This means that sectors such as financial services are now included. Some specific additional requirements, such as . B the carrying out of a criminal record examination, are authorized by the CFTA. In addition, where there are significant differences in labour standards between Canadian jurisdictions for a given occupation, a government may maintain a waiver of the full mobility of labour necessary to achieve a legitimate objective such as public safety. . . .